“Boots in the Barn” Coming in January

A new program for women beef and dairy producers will be held in January in the Dyersville area.

Boots in the Barn is a three part series for women involved in their cattle operation.  Two time sessions will be offered with dairy topics from 1 to 3 pm and beef topics from 6:30-8:30 pm.

Extension staff in Clayton, Delaware and Dubuque counties identified the need for ag programs for women. “We’ve had great success with programs designed specifically for women,” said Denise Schwab, ISU Extension beef specialist. “Women often prefer to learn in small groups and with hands-on opportunities. They like to ask lots of questions of presenters without feeling intimidated, so programs designed for women alone are very effective.”

These three counties all have strong dairy and beef operations with 25% of Iowa’s dairy herds and 5% of Iowa’s beef cow herds. Dairy and beef production has a lot in common, such as reproduction and basic ruminant nutrition. However, they have slightly different perspectives, such as nutritional requirements for maximum milk production, feed quality requirements, and grazing options. “We know dairy producers prefer to meet during the day and beef women prefer evenings,” said Jenn Bentley, ISU Extension dairy specialist, “so we are offering two different programs to best meet each of their needs.”

Boots in the Barn will be held January 4, 11 and 18 with a snow date of February 8.  The dairy session will be offered from 1 to 3 pm and the beef session will be 6:30 to 8:30 pm.

The January 4 session will feature Dr. Leo Timms on milk quality and udder health for the dairy session.  The beef session will feature beef herd health and a herd management calendar. Both sessions will meet at the Commercial Club Park community room in Dyersville.

The January 11 session for both the dairy and beef groups will feature Dr. Grant Dewell, ISU Extension Veterinarian, and others from the vet school with “Frosty the cow”.  “Frosty” is a life-size cow model used to teach calving management, dystocia, and delivery to veterinary students.  Participants will have the opportunity to deliver a fully jointed life-size calf, and practice difficult deliveries on a model.  These sessions will be held at the Fast Stop shed at 32199 Old Castle Rd. in Dyersville.

The January 18 sessions will focus on nutrition with Dr. Hugo Ramirez, ISU Extension dairy specialist.  The dairy session will focus on quality feed delivery, and tools to measure feed quality.  They are encouraged to bring along a feed sample for discussion.  The beef session will feature Ramirez discussing quality silage and Schwab discussing basic beef feed budgeting and cost control. Both sessions will meet at the Commercial Club Park community room in Dyersville.

For more information on Boots in the Barn, contact Bentley, Schwab or the county Extension offices in Clayton, Delaware or Dubuque counties.  Registration will be taken on-line or by mail, and the $25 registration fee can be paid at the first session.  A brochure with registration and program details can be found at https://www.extension.iastate.edu/dairyteam/boots-barn.

 

(photo courtesy of ISU Extension)

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